Guns On The PlayGround

I Am King Jasmine Mans
Idk how to spell Thiahera’s IG :( #ladyliberty

Idk how to spell Thiahera’s IG :( #ladyliberty

photo by : @colinmendez
Poet Jasmine Mans

photo by : @colinmendez

Poet Jasmine Mans

Happy Birthday Jasmine Mans :)

Photo By : Aapplecakes 

Photo By: @c4rv

Jasmine’s Trip to the Pine Ridge Reservation with the @Lakota_Children

One year ago, my dear friend and Glamour Top Ten sister, Maggie Dunne contacted me and told me about the Lakota Tribe on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. She told how much the children loved poetry and relished in art and culture. She began the Lakota Children’s Enrichment program to provide artistic and literary resources to the Native children on the Reservation, aka the “Rez”. Last year, she developed a Youth Summit and Poetry competition for the students, and I was able to send copies of my book to the winners.

This year, on April 9th , I jumped on a flight to South Dakota to meet all of the poets, the Lakota Children’s Enrichment team, and a host of involved parents and teachers. I landed, and was greeted by the excited Maggie, and witty Nobel Peace Prize Winner, Jody Williams. I truly didn’t know what was in store —but I had the feeling it would be memorable.

We’d go to our hotels and the next day we’d take to the roads for the Pine Ridge Reservation. We’d meet up with the youth, that for so many months, we’ve become so familiar with, through Pine Ridge Writing and Art Challenge.

When I met these students, their eyes, had the hope I’ve seen in the eyes of my peers back at home. The students walked with such a modesty and humility, yet their poems spoke loud of colors, rage, and passion.

I’ve been to many places, but the generosity of my new friends on the Rez was something that I couldn’t remember feeling before. People, who had little to give, kept finding reasons to continue to give. There, I felt both honored and undeserving. During our award ceremony for the poets, Jody and I were even honored with quilts. We were wrapped in them and blessed by the people of the Tribal Council.

We even took to the badlands, my eyes swelled as we approached. I have never seen such beauty. The land was sacred in all of its essence, yet eerie in its bloody history. I learned of the elders, who were buried there, and the women and children who were murdered there, this too reminded me of my people back home.

I was allowed to read and write with the youth. The students wrote about peace, and suicide, land, and the realities they’ve become so attached to. I got to South Dakota and stood amongst a wealth of youth that shared my fears as a child. We all had art and education in common. Like me, these children knew that school would be the only way out of poverty. Like me, they fight the mold of oppression. Like me, they are poor, and of color, and they really love poetry. I stood amongst them with an unwavering desire to instill the idea that art and education would be the tool to their futures and now I go to my bed hoping they believe me —- and they remember my words, like I remember theirs.

- Jasmine Mans

Read their poems here: http://goo.gl/LROCiZ
Learn about Lakota Children’s Enrichment here: lakotachildren.org

badinitials:

vintageeveryday:

In 1980, when Obama was known as “Barry”, a freshman at Occidental College in Los Angeles, he was approached by an aspiring photographer named Lisa Jack, who asked him if he would be willing to pose for some black and white photographs that she could use in her portfolio.

The photographs provide an intimate portrait of the soon-to-be-politician, chain smoking cigarettes, flashing his signature grin, leaning within a narrow frame of a hallow and hiding beneath the brim of a straw hat.

GObama.

(Source: vintag.es, via bad-initials)

nickhollywood:

In January 1955, a group of Morgan State University students sat down at the lunch counter of a Read’s drugstore at Howard and Lexington streets, a key event in the nation’s then-nascent civil-rights movement (the chain soon changed its policy and started serving blacks and whites together). These counter stools, from the original Read’s, are on display in the Morgan State University student center.

nickhollywood:

In January 1955, a group of Morgan State University students sat down at the lunch counter of a Read’s drugstore at Howard and Lexington streets, a key event in the nation’s then-nascent civil-rights movement (the chain soon changed its policy and started serving blacks and whites together). These counter stools, from the original Read’s, are on display in the Morgan State University student center.

jasminequotethat:

Rest in peace Trayvon Martin. Today, 2 years ago he was killed shortly after his 17th birthday. I going to keep posting this until KILLING A BLACK MEN & THE SON OF A BLACK MOTHER IS JUST AS IMPORTANT AS KILLING A WHITE MEN. People ask why we give so much attention to this case and why do we care so much? We care so much & give this case so much attention because this is not the first time something like this has happened, it’s becoming a problem and it was about time media shed some light on it. This  is about more than race, how are we allowing African Americans to get killed because of people feeling or thinking we are a threat or harm to them(not because we actually threaten them but because they THOUGHT WE WERE A THREAT). I think people had a right to feel some way about this case, this was a teenager who was killed for walking home with A DRINK ,CANDY, and a HOODIE ON IN FEBRUARY because he “LOOKED SUSPICIOUS”

jasminequotethat:

Rest in peace Trayvon Martin. Today, 2 years ago he was killed shortly after his 17th birthday. I going to keep posting this until KILLING A BLACK MEN & THE SON OF A BLACK MOTHER IS JUST AS IMPORTANT AS KILLING A WHITE MEN. People ask why we give so much attention to this case and why do we care so much? We care so much & give this case so much attention because this is not the first time something like this has happened, it’s becoming a problem and it was about time media shed some light on it. This is about more than race, how are we allowing African Americans to get killed because of people feeling or thinking we are a threat or harm to them(not because we actually threaten them but because they THOUGHT WE WERE A THREAT). I think people had a right to feel some way about this case, this was a teenager who was killed for walking home with A DRINK ,CANDY, and a HOODIE ON IN FEBRUARY because he “LOOKED SUSPICIOUS”